Early weight loss in behavioral weight management programs predicts long-term success

September 22 2022

2 minutes to read

source:

Al-Abdullah and others. SO 523. Presented at: Annual Meeting of the European Society for the Study of Diabetes. from 19 to 23 September 2022; Stockholm (mixed meeting).

Disclosures:
Log reports that he previously worked as a consultant for Novo Nordisk.


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According to a speaker at the annual meeting of the European Society for the Study of Diabetes, adults who lose weight in the first four weeks of a behavioral weight management program are more likely to lose weight successfully in the medium term.

Currently, many providers may offer more intensive treatments per patient, as they don’t think behavioral programs effective, when it is appropriate for many people,” Jennifer Logue, MD, A professor of metabolic medicine at Lancaster University, UK, told Healio. “Other providers let patients struggle with a behavioral program and will withdraw, reinforcing subjective stigma. Our research shows that achieving a 0.5% weight loss after only 4 weeks of the program is predictive. long-term success; People who don’t achieve this may need additional support or alternative treatments.”

Weight loss in the first month is associated with a higher likelihood of short- and long-term weight loss.

Every 1% of body weight lost in the first month of participating in a behavioral weight management program increases the odds of successful short- and long-term weight loss. Data are from Al-Abdullah L. et al. SO 523. Presented at: Annual Meeting of the European Society for the Study of Diabetes. from 19 to 23 September 2022; Stockholm (mixed meeting).

The researchers conducted a longitudinal study of 1,658 adults with obesity and type 2 diabetes who attended a weight management service in Glasgow and Clyde in the United Kingdom (median age, 57.8 years; 60% women). Data were obtained from electronic health records collected by the National Health Service (NHS) Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board. Successful short-term weight loss was defined as attending seven of nine weight management sessions over a 16-week period and achieving a body weight loss of more than 5%. Medium-term weight loss was defined as a loss of more than 5% of body weight by 3 years of age and previously successful short-term weight loss.

Jennifer Log

Of the study group, 20% achieved successful short-term weight loss, and from 1,152 adults with medium-term outcome data, 12.1% achieved medium-term weight loss. Losing every 1% of body weight in the first three program sessions was associated with a greater likelihood of successful short-term weight loss (odds ratio = 2.86; 95% confidence interval, 2.5–3.23). A loss of 0.5% of body weight in the first three sessions predicted a short-term weight loss with a sensitivity of 90.4% and a specificity of 53.6%.

Every 1% of body weight lost in the first three sessions of the weight management program was also associated with a greater likelihood of successful weight loss in the medium term (odds ratio = 2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.92–2.56). A loss of 0.5% of body weight in the first three sessions predicted successful medium-term weight loss with a sensitivity of 89.9% and a specificity of 50.5%. There were no demographic factors or clinical variables associated with successful short or medium term weight loss.

“We were surprised by how simple the model was, but the general idea is based on published evidence from a range of weight management interventions,” Lugo said. “Even for surgery and medication, there is little about a person anticipating results before the intervention, but an early response in the first few months is linked to success. It is helpful to be able to know up to 4 weeks because it allows you to intervene before the person withdraws – we know that Many obese people do not want to attend health care appointments after ‘failure’ to lose weight. Judicial intervention.”

Lugo said future research is needed to examine why people are not successful in weight management programs to identify alternative interventions.