Wearable devices may have a future in kidney care, but challenges remain

September 23, 2022

1 minute reading

source:

Kooman J. Wearable devices: potential applications in renal patients. Presented at: International Conference on Hemodialysis. 21-22 September 2022; (virtual meeting).

Disclosures:
Koeman did not report any relevant financial disclosures.


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Wearable devices may play an important role in the future of kidney care, according to a presenter at the International Conference on Dialysis.

despite Wearable kidney Received attention in recent years with the KidneyX competition and ongoing research, deepeN Koman, Ph.D., A professor at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands, he monitors the various organs.

Quote from Jeroen Kooman, Ph.D.

Sensors and personal area networks can improve patient engagement, shared decision making, personalized care, integration of multiple physiological signals, early detection and action. Jeroen Koeman, PhD, is a professor at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands.

“Nowadays, there are many physiological variables that can be measured relatively easily by wearable devices, but it must also be emphasized that most of these devices are made for the consumer market,” Koeman said in the presentation. “Obviously if we are to implement it in routine clinical practice, it has to be validated in our community of patients.”

For example, dysregulation can be detected by commercial smart watchesIt is able to make electrocardiogram recordings for users, Koeman said. Atrial fibrillation can often occur during the session among dialysis patients; However, nurses usually don’t measure the heart rate or ECG unless the patient complains, according to Koeman. With a wearable device, abnormalities of the heart can be detected during sessions.

Similarly, Koeman referred to a study in which participants wore a tracker that measured changes in heart rate, physical activity and breathing and was able to predict the participant’s risk for COVID-19.

“This does not circumvent the usability test, but it can identify patients at high risk for infection that can lead to early detection,” Koeman said.

Sensors and personal area networks can improve patient engagement, shared decision making, personalized care, integration of multiple physiological signals, early detection and action.

However, Koeman said remaining challenges include whether patients will accept the devices and patients’ digital literacy. Additionally, technologies will need to be validated, focusing on unknown outcomes, potential accountability, and regulatory and ethical issues. Data overload and medicalization of techniques must also be considered.

“What we need in the future are devices … that have been specifically validated in patients with kidney disease,” Koeman said. We will need advanced analytical tools to interpret complex physiological variables. We must have clear user interfaces for patients and healthcare providers. We should initiate observational studies and intervention trials to show their potential benefit. And of course, right from the start, we have to have a lot of awareness of the regulatory and ethical issues.”