Younger age at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is associated with increased risk of death

September 20 2022

2 minutes to read

source:

Seo D et al. SO 883. Presented at: Annual Meeting of the European Society for the Study of Diabetes. from 19 to 23 September 2022; Stockholm (mixed meeting).

Disclosures:
The SEO does not report any relevant financial disclosures.


We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If this issue still occurs, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

is diagnosed Type 2 diabetes Age 40 or younger is associated with a higher risk of death and cardiovascular disease, according to a presenter at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

In findings from more than 634,000 people with type 2 diabetes in South Korea, a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at age 40 or younger was associated with a sixfold higher rate. danger to moralswhich is more than five times higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, and more than seven times the risk of developing heart failure compared to those without diabetes.

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a younger age increases the risk of death.

Adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at age 40 or younger have a higher risk of all-cause death and cardiovascular disease. Data were derived from Seo D, et al. SO 883. Presented at: Annual Meeting of the European Society for the Study of Diabetes. from 19 to 23 September 2022; Stockholm (mixed meeting).

“These nationwide data indicate that mortality and cardiovascular damage associated with type 2 diabetes varies significantly by age at diagnosis, with the highest mortality rates and CVD outcome risks in those with early diagnosed type 2 diabetes,” Da Hye Seo, MD, Ph.D., an assistant professor of medicine at Inha University College of Medicine in Incheon, South Korea, told Helio. “The increased risks related to early diabetes require more attention to preventive strategies and more intensive CV intervention in younger individuals with type 2 diabetes.”

Da Hye Seo

Seo and colleagues conducted a population cohort study of 634,350 people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes with data available in the Korean National Health Insurance Service from 2012 to 2014. The type 2 diabetes cohort was matched, 1:2, by age Gender and previous history of cardiovascular disease with a control group of non-diabetic subjects. All-cause mortality, CVD mortality, coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for heart failure, and 3-point main adverse event outcome were collected. Follow-up continued until 2019.

The study group was followed up with a mean of 5.67 years. Adults with type 2 diabetes diagnosed at age 40 or younger have an increased risk of overall mortality (adjusted heart rate = 6.08; 95% CI, 5.5-6.72), and CVD mortality (adjusted heart rate = 5.53; 95% CI, 4.29-7.14), hospitalization for heart failure (aHR = 7.19; 95% CI, 6.72-7.7) and CHD (aHR = 5.1; 95% CI, 4.91-5.3) compared to controls. Outcome risks gradually decreased with age at diagnosis, although all risks remained significantly higher for adults with type 2 diabetes compared to controls. Those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at 91 years of age or older had an increased risk of overall death (total mortality rate = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.21-1.37), and CVD mortality (aHR = 1.32; 95% CI , 1.15–1.51), hospitalization for heart failure (aHR = 2.95; 95% CI, 2.54–3.42) and CHD (aHR = 3.66; 95% CI, 3.16–4.24) compared to controls.

“Although the increased risk associated with type 2 diabetes was mitigated by age at diagnosis, it remained significant even in people with type 2 diabetes diagnosed at age 80 or older, including cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular deaths. Cardiovascular, suggesting diabetes is needed in all age groups, Siew said.

Seo said prospective intervention trials are needed to further investigate the effect of CV intervention in people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a younger age and whether the risk of death and CVD outcomes are reduced.